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1992

Service Career 1882-1923

MG Harry H. Bandholtz’s distinguished service career featured valorous actions during the Spanish-American War in 1898 and 13 years in the Philippines, which included 6 years as the Chief of the Philippine Constabulary; and culminated as Provost Marshal General of the American Expeditionary Force in France during World War I. In that position, he laid the foundation for the establishment of today’s Military Police Corps by instituting the first Military Police School and by introducing formal operating instructions for the military police. MG Bandholtz is considered the “Father of the MP Corps”.

Service Career 1954-1982

MG John D. Granger’s distinguished service career spanned twenty-eight years and all levels of command, which included Provost Marshal Eighth Army Korea, and Seventh Army Europe, and culminated with his assignment as Commandant of the United States Army Military Police School. MG Granger was the driving force in the focus of the MP Corps on combat support. As a result of his efforts, the Military Police have become a highly mobile, well-armed combat multiplier for the Army of today.

Service Career 1905-1944

MG Allen Wyant Gullion served as Provost Marshal General of the U.S. Army from 1941 until his retirement in December 1944. It was under his leadership that the WWII MP soldier became a highly trained specialist of military law enforcement. MG Gullion first established the role of the MP in EPW operations by supervising the handling of Axis prisoners of war, and enforcement of the Code of the Geneva Convention. The military police became a specialized branch under his direction.

Service Career 1917-1955

MG William H. Maglin served in a number of distinguished assignments throughout his career. Of significant importance was his role in the organization and command of the Military Police replacement Training Center at Fort Riley, Kansas, in March 1942. With his superior knowledge and experience, MG Maglin was essential to the development and training of the newly-formed Military Police Corps. In June of 1950 he was promoted to the rank of Brigadier General, the first career Military Police Officer to attain that honor.

Service Career 1955-1984

CSM James W. Frye’s distinguished service career spanned twenty-nine years and positions from Platoon Sergeant to Command Sergeant Major. CSM Frye was appointed in 1979 as the Provost Marshal of the Mannheim Military Community, the first NCO to hold such a position. CSM Frye subsequently became the MP School Sergeant Major where he was instrumental in upgrading the professionalism and image of the Military Police Non-commissioned Officer. In September 1982, MG Granger appointed CSM Frye as the first Regimental Sergeant Major.

1993

Service Career 1940-1973

Initially commissioned in the Infantry Reserve in 1940, MG Harley L. Moore’s first Military Police assignment was as the Assistant Provost Marshal of General George S. Patton’s Third Army. He subsequently served in major Provost Marshal assignments in the Far East and Europe. He also served as the Deputy to the Provost Marshal General of the Army, and, during the Vietnam Conflict, was concurrently the Provost Marshal, U.S. Army Vietnam and the Commanding General, 18th Military Police Brigade. His final assignment was as the Commanding General of Fort Gordon, Georgia, then the home of the Military Police School. He was only the second Military Police officer to hold that position.

Service Career 1960-1987

BG David H. Stem’s distinguished service spanned more than twenty-six years and included assignments as Brigade Provost Marshal, Commander of a CID Field Office, Commander of the 95th Military Police Battalion, and Commander of the CID’s Second Region. As the Commandant of the Military Police School, he oversaw the activation of the Military Police Corps Regiment, revitalized the Military Police Regimental Association, instituted Worldwide Military Police Proponency Conferences, and developed force packages that were responsive to the needs of today’s Army.

Service Career 1942-1974

COL Henry H. Tufts’ distinguished career spanned from the opening year of World War II to the end of the Vietnam Conflict. For 28 years, he served in the area of law enforcement and criminal investigation within the Army, culminating in his tour as the first commander of the Army’s Criminal Investigation. Command. His integrity and credibility in that position molded the character of the organization and was exemplified in the motto that he created: “Do What Has to Be Done.”

Service Career 1960-1988

CSM Roland M. Gaddy’s distinguished career of 28 years included service as a Squad Leader, Platoon Sergeant, First Sergeant, Military Police Desk Sergeant, Patrol Supervisor, Traffic Accident Investigator, Physical Security NCO, Training NCO, and Instructor. He completed four successful tours as a CSM prior to becoming the Military Police Corps Regimental CSM in 1984. In that position, he was the driving force behind the creation and accreditation of the Military Police Corps Noncommissioned Officers Academy and was a key leader in revitalizing the Military Police Corps Regimental Association.

1994

Service Career 1957-1990

MG Eugene R. Cromartie’s distinguished career spanned over thirty-two years and included assignments as Commander of the 503rd Military Police Battalion and Provost Marshal of the 82nd Airborne Division. As the Commanding General of the United States Army CID Command, he greatly expanded the Army’s capability to investigate economic crime and developed an automated criminal information reporting system. Throughout his career, he was respected and renowned within the Army as a “Soldier’s Soldier.”

Service Career 1954-1992

MG Charles A. Hines’ distinguished service spanned thirty-eight years and included assignments as the Commander of the 519th Military Police Battalion and commander of the 14th Military Police Brigade. As the Commanding General of Fort McClellan and Commandant of the Military Police School, he established the Military Police School as a focal point for training in support of the Department of Defense’s war on drugs. He clearly demonstrated his motto ‘’It takes only one person to make a difference in another’s life.”

Service Career 1945-1989

Mr. Robert A. Brisentine, Jr. served as an active duty soldier and civilian employee with the Military Police Corps for over forty-four years. He began his service as an enlisted soldier in World War II and culminated his career as the Director of the Crime Records Center (CRC). He established the CRC and pioneered criminal records maintenance and retrieval. He also established the Army Polygraph Program and instituted the first polygraph quality control program in the United States. He did what had to be done and much more.

1995

Service Career 1927-1957

BG Jeremiah P. Holland entered the fledgling Military Police Corps in 1941. He subsequently served in such key assignments as the Deputy to the Provost Marshal General and twice as the Commandant of the Provost Marshal General’s School. He also contributed immensely to the development of the Corps’ Esprit by serving as a charter member of the Military Police Association and by endowing the JEREMIAH P. HOLLAND AWARD, which is given each year to the “best unit in the Military Police Corps.” He was one of the “Founding Fathers” of the Corps.

Service Career 1958-1988

During 30 years of distinguished military service, COL Orville N. Butts served in a wide variety of critical leadership and managerial positions, culminating with that of Assistant Deputy Commandant of the U. S. Army Command and General Staff College. Earlier, he was responsible for defining the force structure and equipment of today’s Military Police while serving as the Director of Combat Developments at the Military Police School. In honor of his achievements, COL Butts was named the first Honorary Colonel of the Military Police Corps Regiment in 1989.

Service Career 1943-1990

During more than 45 years of military and civilian service, Mr. Decker gained an international reputation as a world expert in the use of the polygraph machine in criminal investigations. He developed a standardized polygraph questioning technique, devised a student reaction monitoring device, and designed new polygraph instruments. He also established a polygraph maintenance program and oversaw the creation of the Department of Defense Polygraph Institute. His nickname of “Mr. Polygraph” aptly summarizes his achievements.

1996

Service Career 1917-1954

Colonel Cadwell served as a member of the Military Police Corps during three wars: World War I, World War II, and the Korean Conflict. Among his numerous assignments was that of Provost Marshal General of the Eighth Army in Japan after World II. His sensitive treatment of the Japanese while in that position contributed immeasurably to the improvement of relations between the United States and its former foe. In addition, his subsequent service as the Commander of the Prisoner of War Command in Korea provided the Military Police Corps with a wealth of material for its Enemy Prisoner of War Doctrine.

Service Career 1968-1992

Colonel Sutherland held a number of key positions within the Military Police Corps during his 24 years of military service. Among them were Deputy Provost Marshal of the 1st Cavalry Division,Commander of the 545th Military Police Company, and Commander of the 720th Military Police Battalion. He also served as the Director of Combat Developments at the Military Police School. He was responsible for restructuring the personnel and equipment of all Military Police units from Division thru echelons above Corps. He also led the efforts to obtain the Armored Security Vehicle, the MK 19 Grenade Machine Gun, and Night Vision Equipment for the Military Police.

Service Career 1953-1996

Major Aide has been a valued mainstay within the Military Police Corps for forty-three years. For over thirty-three of those years, he distinguished himself as the Military Police School’s International Military Student Officer (IMSO), becoming the premier IMSO within the U.S. Army. In that capacity he displayed consummate expertise in dealing with a multitude of officers of diverse nationalities and succeeded in securing more than $250,000 per year in tuition and course costs for the school. In addition, he ably orchestrated the arrangements for visits by numerous foreign dignitaries, contributing immeasurably to the prestige of the Corps throughout the world.

1997

Service Career 1918-1956

Brigadier General Howard served the Military Police Corps in World War II and Korea. His assignments included Commanding General of Fort Gordon and Commanding General of the Provost Marshal General’s Center. He also served as Provost Marshal of the Panama Canal Department, the United Kingdom, the China Theater, the United Nations Command, and the Far East Command. Additionally, when the Army Reorganization Act of 1950 was pending in Congress, he assisted in the solution of many legislative issues incidental to the establishment of the Military Police Corps as a permanent branch of the Army, and was the founding father of the Military Police Association.

Service Career 1968-1996

Colonel Sullivan distinguished himself as the consummate leader throughout the Army and the Military Police Corps by commanding military police units from company to brigade level. His conduct during combat and contingency operations in the Republic of Vietnam, Saudi Arabia/ Iraq, Panama, Honduras, and Haiti, is revered and respected by superiors and subordinates alike for his leadership, tactical instinct, and compassionate concern for the soldiers under his charge. Colonel Sullivan concluded his military career as Deputy Commander, United States Army Criminal Investigation Command.

Service Career 1964-1994

CSM Perry, a “soldier’s soldier,” culminated his 30-year military career as the Military Police Corps’ third Regimental Command Sergeant Major and as Commandant of the Military Police Noncommissioned Officers Academy. In that capacity, he was the driving force for instituting the Small Group Leader Instruction Program and for the accreditation of the Military Police Noncommissioned Officers Academy. Since then, the Military Police Noncommissioned Officers Academy has been the cornerstone of leadership development throughout the Training and Doctrine Command.

1998

Service Career 1865-1901

Known as the “Father of the Military Prison,” General Barr took the first steps in creating military prisons. In 1871, he submitted a communication to the Secretary of War calling attention to the harsh treatment of military prisoners in state prisons and military stockades. Ultimately a bill was signed on May 21, 1874, establishing the military prison at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. The prison was operational one year later and General Barr served on the prison commission until 1894. He made other significant contributions during his career as well, serving as military secretary to four U.S. Secretaries of War and as a judge participating in several important military trials. At the end of his career, General Barr was appointed the Judge Advocate General of the Army for a single day. The appointment was a farewell gift for the Civil War veteran who had served his country, the Military Police Corps to come, and his army so well.

Service Career 1960-1989

General Foote is a legend throughout the Military Police Corps and the Army. She has served our nation with distinction for over 30 years. Her contributions include a wide range of firsts as she led the integration of women into the active Army. A fair-minded and tenacious commander, General Foote has always set the standard when it came to our leadership values – competence, commitment, candor, and courage. Throughout 30 years of service, General Foote has and continues to contribute to our Army and Military Police Corps. She has pioneered the way to the future, breaking ground for all who are following and those yet to join. General Foote is a consummate professional soldier. She has taken the path less traveled by and that has made all the difference.

Service Career 1940-1972

CW4 “Chief” Parker entered the Army in 1940 as a cook; he was selected as a member of the elite Devil’s Brigade, distinguishing himself in combat in both the European and Pacific theaters. Following World War II, he transitioned into the Military Police Corps and in 1949, became a special agent. In 1969, Mr. Parker received the Turner Special Agent of the Year award in recognition of his superb duty performance. In 1972, he retired from military service and served in a variety of positions within the Montgomery County Sheriff’s Office, Clarksville, Tennessee. In 1983, he returned to CID as a civilian special agent serving at the Fort Campbell, Kentucky, District Office. At the age of 73, following more than 50 years of public service, he retired for second time. Throughout his career, he served as a mentor, role model, and recruiting icon. A man of character, courage, compassion, and commitment; he truly set the standard for all to follow.

1999

Service Career 1962-1995

General Berry’s distinguished career included commands at every level from company to major Army command culminating with assignments as the Commandant, U.S. Army Military Police School and Commanding General, U.S. Army Criminal Investigation Command. While serving as the battalion commander of a Criminal Investigation Command District and later, the 385th Military Police Battalion, his innovative concepts for improving military police and criminal investigative support to theater commanders were the genesis for concepts which formed the foundation of current Military Police Corps doctrine. During his 33 year career, General Berry strove to ensure excellence and was the driving force for implementing initiatives that are still in force today.

Service Career 1966-1993

CW4 Parker served with the United States Army Criminal Investigation Command for 29 years. Throughout his distinguished career, Mr. Parker served in several positions where he could train and mentor young special agents. He consistently gave 100 percent of himself; his demand for excellence was superseded only by his concern for the welfare of his soldiers and their families. Mr. Parker’s astute ability of forward thinking resulted in procurement of equipment and streamlined controls that increased operational productivity in all areas. Throughout his stellar career, he ensured that the motto of “Every Soldier is A Winner” permeated throughout his organization.

Service Career 1963-1993

Command Sergeant Major Stalter held a wide range of leadership positions throughout his 30 year career, culminating in his assignment as the Military Police Corps Regimental Sergeant Major. Always looking out for soldiers and their families, Command Sergeant Major Stalter engaged in numerous proactive measures to improve the quality of life both in garrison and during deployments. His mentorship of noncommissioned officers and officers alike has produced top-notch leaders throughout the Army. Command Sergeant Major Stalter epitomizes all that the professional soldier, leader, and policeman is supposed to be. He is the consummate professional soldier and continues to serve our great nation.

2000

Service Career 1961-1990

General Cadoria was a trailblazer throughout her diverse and stellar 29-year career. Initially, she served in the Women’s Army Corps (WAC) and then branch transferred to the Military Police Corps in the early 1970s. She was one of the first women to serve as a military police officer. General Cadoria served in the Republic of Vietnam from January 1967 to October 1969, where she was assigned to the Office of the U.S. Army Vietnam Provost Marshal and later to the Qui Nhon Support Command. During this assignment, she was awarded three Bronze Stars and also an Air Medal for meritorious service at Cam Ranh Bay. Later she served as Commander, MP School Battalion and subsequently, the Commander, First Region CID Command. She also served as a Director on the Joint Staff for the Chairman, Joint Chiefs of Staff. Since her retirement, she has served in a variety of leadership positions in the community, corporate and academic worlds. Her significant contributions to the Military Police Corps, the Army and to America are a reflection of her belief that “The dictionary is the only place where ‘success’ comes before ‘work’.”

Service Career 1967-1992

Colonel Sowa commanded at every level from platoon through brigade and held key positions at several major Army commands and Department of the Army levels during his outstanding career of 25-plus years. From the Republic of Vietnam, Germany, and Saudi Arabia to numerous stateside locations, Colonel Sowa consistently epitomized the MP warrior ethos and spirit. As the 89th MP Brigade Commander, Ft. Hood, TX, he spearheaded multiple corps-sized unit movements during Operations Desert Shield, Desert Storm, and Desert Calm in Saudi Arabia, Iraq, and Kuwait. As a Pentagon senior staff officer, Colonel Sowa’s knowledge, allegiance, and vision paved the way for the MP Corps to become the Army’s “Force of Choice.” His unwavering dedication to soldiers, the Military Police Corps and the Army embodies a true professional. Colonel Sowa is a current member of the U.S. Army Officer Candidate School Hall of Fame and continues to volunteer his knowledge and insight to his community and his country.

Service Career 1966-1996

CSM Malavet faithfully dedicated himself to 30 years of extraordinary service to the United States Army and the Military Police Corps Regiment. He always sought out the tough, challenging jobs involving soldiers. His keen organizational abilities and dedicated leadership were instrumental in creating one of the finest NCO Academies in the Army. His commitment to giving every soldier a chance to succeed produced some of our best military police soldiers currently serving in the NCO ranks. He has served across the globe from Puerto Rico to Germany to Southwest Asia, where he is well known for his literary and artistic talents. Throughout his career, he touched countless lives with his sage counsel, compassion, leadership and love for soldiers. Senior leaders throughout the Military Police Corps and the Army continue to seek him out for his insight and advice. CSM Malavet’s duty performance, caring attitude, and emphasis on Army values directly affected all soldiers as well as leaders.

2001

Service Career 1965-1991

Colonel Ferguson commanded at every level from company to brigade and served in key staff positions in both the Departments of the Army and Defense during his career of 26 years. He served overseas in Europe and saw combat in the Republic of Vietnam where he was wounded in combat operations and received the Purple Heart Medal. As Commander of United States Criminal Investigation Command, he initiated several innovative programs to combat fraud, waste and abuse involving Army travel polices. COL Ferguson demonstrated an unwavering dedication to training by developing a vigorous, exacting, and imaginative program that resulted in the achievement of a mobile, combatready, and deployable force during the Cold War in Europe. Further, he provided steadfast and inspirational leadership for some of the most dynamic and complex challenges in Army history while working as the Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Military Manpower and Personnel. His proactive diplomacy and knowledge of intergovernmental relationships were instrumental to the development, establishment, and implementation of key personnel initiatives pertaining to compensation, training, education, and personnel management programs. COL Ferguson possessed extraordinary insight and ability to guide senior leaders on the importance of maintaining the Military Police Corps as a combat multiplier and the “Force of Choice.”

Service Career 1942-1973

Colonel Hyde is one of the few distinguished leaders to have permanently impacted the Military Police Corps through his tenacious ability to lead troops effectively in peace and war. During World War II, at the Battle of the Bulge in 1944, LTG George Patton recognized then 2LT Hyde’s potential for excellence and issued him an immediate battlefield promotion to 1LT. In March of 1945, 1LT Hyde led the Military Police forward element at the Ludendorff railroad bridge, Remagen, Germany. His detachment, while encountering intense fire and severe casualties, assisted in securing the bridge area and established rigid traffic control and holding patterns, ensuring traffic continued unblocked and unimpeded day and night across the bridge. For his bravery and gallantry under intense fire, 1LT Hyde was awarded the Silver Star. After the war, Colonel Hyde served in many leadership positions, including seven Provost Marshal positions. Colonel Hyde initiated, advocated and established the Military Police Detector Dog Program and established a dynamic cargo security and pilferage protection program for the Military Traffic Management and Terminal Service. During his 31 years of service, Colonel Hyde significantly impacted the character, doctrine, and long-term combat support focus of the Military Police Corps.

Service Career 1943-1971

Colonel Maclean was truly one of the great early leaders of the Military Police Corps. There was a common thread of selfless service in everything he did throughout his career of 28 years. From leading soldiers in heavy combat as a non-commissioned officer in World War II, to leading them as a senior officer in Vietnam, Colonel Maclean always did so through personal example. He consistently disregarded his personal safety at the risk of life and limb to lead his units to success. His acts of personal courage were the type from which legends are made. Colonel Maclean was awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action against German troops in Germany during World War II and awarded the Soldier’s Medal for disregarding personal safety by disarming a man attempting to set off explosives in the United
States Capitol in 1971. In every assignment on active duty and every job beyond that, Colonel Maclean made immediate and lasting contributions to the Army, to the community, and to the United States. Colonel Maclean was, and always will be, a bona fide hero to the United States Army and to the Nation.

2002

Service Career 1949-1983

Major General Timmerberg’s distinguished career spanned more than 34 years, including valorous service in combat and contributions that measurably impacted the Military Police Corps. While serving in Vietnam as Provost Marshal, 1st Infantry Division, Major General Timmerberg was awarded the “V” device for valor on his seventh Air Medal for fearless conduct while under direct ground fire, successfully averting an ambush of a convoy under his protection. On his second assignment to Vietnam, he received the Distinguished Service Medal for his inspiration and his strict discipline for military police in combat support missions. He successfully commanded from detachment to brigade command with his career culminating as a Major General and Commanding General of the U.S. Army Criminal Investigation Command. As Commanding General, U.S. Army Criminal Investigation Command, Major General Timmerberg brought his command to a position of preeminence among all law enforcement agencies worldwide. Major General Timmerberg’s outstanding leadership, loyalty, and heroic conduct in wartime and peacetime make him a role model for all Military Police throughout our Corps.

Service Career: 1969-1995

Command Sergeant Major Joas served his Nation, the United States Army, and the Military Police Corps for twenty-six years. During his service, he made remarkable contributions to thousands of military police men and women by leading them to success and honor under very difficult circumstances. Command Sergeant Major Joas’ innovative training of soldiers, groundbreaking employment of military police forces, and dynamic, yet caring leadership style were evident throughout his entire career. During the invasion of Panama, as part of the Provost Marshal Cell and the 82d MP Company, Command Sergeant Major Joas participated in the only combat parachute assault by a military police company in history. He served as a battalion Command Sergeant Major in both Saudi Arabia and Iraq during the Gulf War and as a brigade Command Sergeant Major in Haiti during Operations Uphold/Restore Democracy. This outstanding leader, noncommissioned officer, and Soldier is one of the key people responsible for establishing the positive reputation our regiment has today. Command Sergeant Major Joas, through his actions and deeds, is truly one of the obvious reasons many senior leaders consider the Military Police Corps their “Force of Choice.”

2003

Service Career 1943-1978

Colonel Hill’s innovative career spanned more than 35 years, including three combat tours of duty in two theaters of operations: one in Europe during WWII and two in the Republic of Vietnam. Colonel Hill was highly decorated during his exemplary military career. Colonel Hill was continuously nominated to be placed in the most demanding positions, which included Military Police Advisor to the Provost Marshal General of the Royal Thai Army which played a major role in Thailand support for the U.S. involvement in Southeast Asia. He was also awarded the Merito e Dedicacao Medal for his meritorious service to the Brazilian Military Police. Colonel Hill instilled personal accountability, integrity, character, and devotion to duty, faith and courage with whomever and wherever he served. Colonel Hill was known as a Soldier’s Soldier, a Military Policeman, scholar, humanitarian, and an outstanding commander whose tremendous abilities had an impact on not only the Military Police Corps Regiment but the U.S. Army as a whole.

Service Career 1953-1979

Colonel Lowrey’s distinguished Army career spanned more than 25 years of faithful service, including valorous service in combat and contributions, which had a measurable impact on the Military Police Corps. Colonel Lowrey was instrumental in the final decision by Army’s leaders to retain the MP Corps. While serving as the Provost Marshal of the Philadelphia Detachment, Colonel Lowrey established excellent relations with the Philadelphia Metropolitan Police and FBI. His efforts raised the prestige of the Provost Marshal Office and he was regarded as a law enforcement professional with great tact and diplomacy. While serving in Vietnam as the Division G-l , Colonel Lowrey was awarded his second Legion of Merit for improving the living conditions of his troops and the study on drug abuse and suppression, alerting Army leaders about the need for the Military Police in a combat environment. Colonel Lowrey’s outstanding leadership, loyalty, and professionalism make him a role model for all Military Police throughout our Corps.

Service Career 1960-2001

Major Ribich’s distinguished Army career spanned more than 40 years of faithful service, including valorous service in combat. He carries the standard as the leader of the finest hour of combat in Military Police history. His exemplary actions and that of his troops led to the designation of the Military Police Corps as a Combat Support unit. While serving in Vietnam, Major Ribich was awarded the Bronze Star Medal of Heroism for bravery in the defense of the U.S. Embassy during the 1968 TET Offensive. Major Ribich was also instrumental in establishing the USAMPS Antiterrorism Training Program for members of the Department of Defense. Major Ribich has efficiently and professionally led the force protection training programs that support the United States Army Military Police Corps. Major Ribich’s outstanding leadership, loyalty, and bravery undoubtedly will stand as his legacy to our Military Police Corps.

2004

Service Career 1943-1978

Colonel Cohn’s distinguished Army career spanning nearly 35 years with combat service in World War II and Vietnam measurably impacted the evolution, character, doctrine, and mission of the Military Police Corps. Commanding at every level including Platoon, Company, Battalion, and Group, his career culminated as Chief of Staff of the Military District of Washington. His significant contributions are founded in a stalwart belief in service to humanity and in solidarity with his strong devotion to duty and country. For his extraordinary efforts in the U.S. counter-drug war, Colonel Cohn was awarded by the German Minister of Finance the German Presidential “Grosse Verdienst Kreuz” (The Grand Service Cross), a celebrated military decoration. He brought together an international narcotics working group that still exists in the 21st Century. Colonel Cohn has made significant and lasting contributions to the Army, the Military Police Corps Regiment, his community, and the countless military retirees who served our country in time of need. His selfless service, reflective of his tenacity and great personal effort, is evident in the numerous contributions to which many aspire, but few attempt, and only very small numbers succeed.

Service Career 1971-2001

CSM Burleson’s meritorious leadership and outstanding service in positions of increasing responsibility, culminating as the sixth Regimental Command Sergeant Major, had a profound impact on the Military Police Corps. Throughout his 30-year Military Police career, CSM Burleson distinguished himself by performing in every leadership position at all organizational levels within the Military Police Corps both in CONUS and overseas. CSM Burleson is the only Military Police Noncommissioned Officer to serve as the First Sergeant, Commander, and Commandant of the Military Police Noncommissioned Officers Academy. His assignments included Chief Weapons Instructor, Directorate of Training, U.S. Army Military Police School; Command Sergeant Major, 701st Military Police Battalion Fort McClellan Alabama; Headquarters, 95th Military Police Battalion, Mannheim, Germany, and Headquarters 18th Military Police Brigade (Forward) with Task Force Eagle in Bosnia-Herzegovina. This superlative leader’s dedication and loyalty to every Soldier has had a profound impact on the Military Police Corps Regiment through his unwavering drive and devotion.

Service Career 1971-1999

CSM Thomas served the Military Police Corps Regiment, the Army, and our great Nation with high honor and distinction for 28 years. Throughout his Military Police career, CSM Thomas excelled in every Military Police capacity, every leadership position, and every organizational level in the Military Police Corps. His assignments included tours in Germany, CONUS, Supreme Headquarters Allied Powers Europe, Johnston Island, Republic of Panama, and Korea. CSM Thomas set a new standard for Military Police Soldiers when he was the first and only Command Sergeant Major from the Military Police Corps Regiment selected to serve at the four star level as the Command Sergeant Major, United Nations Command, Combined Forces Command, United States Forces Korea, and Eighth United States Army. His uncanny ability to focus Soldiers on standards, fundamentals, and the task at hand, guaranteed success in real world missions ranging from operational deployments to Panama and Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, to Operation Just Cause/Restore Hope, and Desert Shield/Storm. CSM Thomas’ impact on the Military Police Corps Regiment will last for years to come and contributed greatly to its recognition as the Army’s Force of Choice.

2005

Service Career 1970-2001

BG Foley’s contributions throughout his 31-year career have made an indelible impact in our Corps and our Army. His vision on defining the Regiment’s role in supporting contingency operations set the conditions for success for our Military Police Soldiers and their units employed in support of operations today. He developed the Military Police Corps Regiment vision and implemented a corporate-level strategy for the Military Police Corps and Army Criminal Investigation Command that guided both organizations to the highest levels of excellence within the Department of Defense. General Foley inspired confidence in all who served with him; he gained the trust and respect of dignitaries and officials at the highest levels, thereby forging a solid reputation for the Military Police globally. Additionally, he was responsible for establishing the Warfighter Center that was selected as the best within the Training and Doctrine Command. General Foley developed the motto “Force of Choice” which has instilled pride into MP units throughout the world. He served as the Commandant of the Military Police School and Chief of the Military Police until September 1998 when he assumed command of the U.S. Army Criminal Investigation Command. General Foley clearly embodies those attributes and values that brings great credit on the Military Police Corps Regiment and the Army.

Service Career 1965-1991

COL Brede served his country in peace and war for 26 years and clearly distinguished himself as a skillful leader by commanding units from platoon through brigade during his career. COL Brede significantly enhanced Military Police doctrine, organizational flexibility, and the Corps’ ability to conduct operational missions across the full spectrum of military operations. Throughout his career, he served as an example to the Army and the Military Police Corps for deploying on short-notice, shaping the operational environment, conducting combat operations, and conducting post conflict operations. COL Brede served in a wide variety of key command staff assignments including five years in Joint and Allied Headquarters and seven years of overseas service. He was instrumental in the development of joint service and Army doctrines, organization, and operational employment of forces. His most significant contribution to the Military Police Corps was his leadership, coaching and mentoring of his subordinates. He was in essence, a “Soldier’s Soldier”—he epitomizes what a Soldier and leader should be. COL Brede exemplifies the adage “Lead by Example” and epitomized the selfless service that is the bedrock of our armed forces. His contributions to our Military Police Corps Regiment and the Army are numerous, significant, and long-lasting.

Service Career 1956-1995

CW5 Kangas’ extraordinary military career spanned 39 years of active service. He was the first CID Warrant Officer accepted to the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology where he earned his Fellowship in Forensic Medicine. At the U.S. Army Military Police School, Chief Kangas was instrumental in the doctrinal development within the areas of death investigations, major case investigations, criminalistics, and forensic science. Chief Kangas served in both CONUS and OCONUS assignments in which he received numerous awards. While assigned to Criminal Investigations Command, he performed the role of “troubleshooter” and was frequently dispatched to locations worldwide to supervise or provide advice on complex or problem criminal investigations of high level interest. Firsts for Chief Kangas include: a Masters Degree in Forensic Science from the George Washington University; first CW5 in CID; first Warrant Officer in CID to receive the Distinguished Service Medal; first active duty CID Special Agent to be promoted to the rank of Fellow in the American Academy of Forensic Sciences; first and only CID Warrant Officer to complete a career of more than 39 years of active duty and the first and only CID Agent trained in Voice Print Spectography. He is the consummate servant leader and teacher. Chief Kangas’ career and his contributions truly reflect great credit on the Military Police Corps Regiment and the Army.

2006

Service Career 1967-2000

MG Meyer served the United States with distinction for over 33 years. He commanded at every position from Platoon Leader to Brigade Commander and held specialized command and staff positions at the highest level in the Army. While serving in these position he immeasurably impacted the Military Police Corps and improved the quality of life for all Soldiers and their families. His incomparable ability and professionalism as the Army’s Chief of Public Affairs created a venue for the Army’s civilian and military leadership to use talented Military Police officers in key non-MP positions at the highest levels in the Army. Additionally, MG Meyer is the author of “Company Command, The Bottom Line” a writing that continue to influence Soldiers and young leaders of yesterday and today. MG Meyer is a creative genius with unsurpassed diplomacy along with the ability to innovatively solve high level, politically sensitive problems. MG Meyer promoted the highest traditions of military service and continues to be a credit to himself, the United States Army, and the Nation.

Service Career 1965-1994

BG Chidichimo served as an outstanding leader and visionary professional, who consistently demonstrated initiative and dedication during his 29 years of service. Chidichimo served in numerous positions in the Military Police Corps. During his career he had the distinct honor of serving in Vietnam as Commander of the 716th Military Police Battalion and 89th Military Police Brigade; and as Provost Marshal, United States Army Europe. He culminated his career as the Commandant of the United States Military Police School and Deputy Commanding General, Fort McClellan, Alabama. Chidichimo was a consummate leader and mentor who had a lasting and positive impact on those who served with him. He contributed directly to the evolution of the MP Corps from a law enforcement centric force to a true combat support branch that is a valued, versatile combat multiplier on today’s battlefield. Chidichimo was able to implement training and force protection programs in support of operations around the world. His thumbprint on the philosophy guiding the training of the Regiment’s young warriors is still evident today. BG Chidichimo was a true visionary and pillar of the Military Police Corps Regiment and coined the phrases “combat multiplier” and “Force of Choice” and gave them true meaning that impacts on the MP Corps today.

2007

Service Career 1954-1985

Colonel Thomas A. Mac Donnell’s career spanned 32 remarkable years. His significant contributions included doctrinal, operational, and developmental activities at all levels from company to Headquarters Department of the Army as well as command at all levels from platoon to MP Group. During his career, COL Mac Donnell authored the 1964 issue of FM 19-25 introducing a new era of MP operations in a combat environment. COL Mac Donnell was a key player in the coordination and deployment of a military sky marshal force on short notice following the 1970 hijacking of flights by the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine. As commander of the 519th Military Police Battalion, he led his battalion in two critical deployments in support of the nation’s capitol — protection of the Pentagon during the anti-Vietnam War demonstration of May 1972 and in support of the 1973 Presidential inauguration. COL Mac Donnell was selected to become the Chief of the Office of Army Law Enforcement and served as the senior Military Police officer on the Army staff, in effect the Army’s Provost Marshal Colonel. He took personal initiative and constant attention to every aspect of Army operations and procedures to assure that police, physical security, corrections, and EPW issues were properly addressed in senior staff deliberation, planning and policy development. Colonel Mac Donnell’s career and significant contributions reflect great credit on the Military Police Corp Regiment and the Army.

Service Career 1942-1978

Colonel James D. Tynan’s distinguished Army career spanned nearly 36 years from May 1942 through January 1978 to include three major conflicts. He measurably impacted the force protection role and law enforcement mission of the Military Police Corps in today’s Army. His Army service, replete with actions of valor in both command and staff positions, was accomplished during four tours of duty in three combat theaters. COL Tynan is one of a select few Military Police Officers to successfully command three high impact Military Police Groups all with different missions. Throughout his long and distinguished career in numerous key assignments, he significantly impacted the character, doctrine, and long term mission of the Military Police Corps. COL Tynan received the highest honor to be bestowed by the French Police, the Medal of Honor of the French Police while assigned as the Provost Marshal, Orleans Area Command. His valorous service, coupled with his numerous contributions in peacetime and combat, were uniquely accomplished both as an Army officer of Infantry and Military Police. Colonel
Tynan is a genuine role model for every member of the MP Corps and his unheralded dedication of duty to the service of our Nation stands true today.

2008

Service Career 1975-2005

Colonel David F. Treuting had a distinguished military career in which he provided exceptionally meritorious service to our Nation, the United States Army, and the Military Police Corps Regiment. His vision, dedication, commitment to excellence, inspirational leadership, and genuine concern for Soldiers and their families significantly influenced Military Police doctrine, organization, training, operations, and leader development. His key staff positions included Chief, Plans and Policy; Third Army Provost Marshal Office in Saudi Arabia; 1st Cavalry Division Provost Marshal at Fort Hood, TX; Director of Operational Protection for CFLCC in Iraq; and the USAMPS 43rd Assistant Commandant. As Garrison Commander, he was the last active duty Commander of Fort McClellan, Alabama, and was charged with closing out the Army’s 82-year history at that post. His final assignment was as the Senior Army Advisor to the Louisiana Army National Guard.

Service Career 1975-2002

Command Sergeant Major Rimmer’s career was one of dedication and selfless service. CSM Rimmer continually proved his reputation of living up to the NCO creed in showing that no one was more professional. An accomplished NCO, he is a two time winner of the Association of the United States Army Leadership Award and served three separate times as a Company First Sergeant. His key leadership positions included First Sergeant of the Sergeants Major Academy; Command Sergeant Major, 716th Military Police Battalion; Command Sergeant Major, 709th Military Police Battalion; Command Sergeant Major, 14th Military Police Brigade; and the 7th Regimental Command Sergeant Major. As the 14th Military Police Brigade Command Sergeant Major, he directly oversaw the transition to and integration of training at the new home of the Regiment at Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri. CSM Rimmer will not only be remembered for his steadfastness and commitment to excellence, but in the legacy of the training programs he set in place throughout his career.

2009

Service Career 1978-2005

COL Spain had a distinguished Army career that spanned more than 26 years. He held every leadership position from Platoon Leader to Brigade Commander. His illustrious service from June 1978 through January 2005 culminated in his leading the first Military Police Brigade into combat operations as part of the invasion of Iraq on 23 March 2003. During its deployment, the 18th Military Police Brigade was one of the largest Military Police Brigades in history, with 11 battalions, 42 companies and over 9,000 Soldiers. COL Spain’s unique ability to train and mentor Soldiers and leaders set an example for all to follow. His infectious attitude, spirit, and unique leadership style significantly contributed to the Military Police Corps Regiment’s outstanding reputation throughout the Army.

Service Career 1981-2006

SGM Donald A. Rose served a distinguished Army career spanning nearly 25 years. He held every NCO leadership position from Team Leader to Sergeant Major. He also held critical positions within USAMPS and the Human Resources Command. SGM Rose measurably impacted the Military Police Corps as well as the Army’s quality of life for Soldiers and their families. His unique capacity and professionalism set an example for the Army’s civilian and military leadership and helped mold the future structure of the Military Police Corps Regiment. His vision and foresight during a critical time in the Military Police Corps’ history had a lasting impact on the Regiment and will continue to do so for many years to come.

Service Career 1963-1984

First Sergeant Nick D. Bacon served a distinguished Army career that spanned 21 years. He held every leadership position from Infantry Team Leader through Military Police First Sergeant. 1SG Bacon transferred to the Military Police Corps in 1969. First Sergeant Bacon answered the ultimate call to duty, where his actions on 26 August 1968 west of Tam Ky Vietnam, resulted in him being awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor for conspicuous gallantry. During 1SG Bacon’s Military Police career from 1969-1984, he served in key leadership positions throughout the Military Police Corp Regiment. His career culminated as the First Sergeant of Co E, 12th MP BN, Fort McClellan, AL. Throughout his career, 1SG Bacon tirelessly trained, mentored, and led Military Police Soldiers to prepare them for their duties and missions around  the world.

2010

Service Career 1972-2004

Brigadier General Stephen J. Curry’s distinguished career spanned over 32 years of dedicated service as a highly decorated member of the Military Police Corps with outstanding professional credentials. He served a total of over eight years in military police command positions from Platoon through Brigade to include command in combat, and in high level staff assignments at Headquarters Department of the Army. General Curry’s recognized and noteworthy achievements in many key MP assignments proved critical in promoting and ensuring the continued independence, growth and relevance of the Military Police Corps as an integral and valued combat multiplier and contributor to the Army’s combined arms team. Ultimately, his leadership and visionary efforts as a highly respected MP officer and leader established the conditions for the Corps’ continuing growth and development, and enabled the Military Police Corps to meet the increasingly high demand for the Army’s “Force of Choice” in the Global War on Terrorism.

Service Career 1971-2003

CW4 Richard Hinson’s contributions span over 31 years of military and federal service. As Special Agent in Charge of two CID Offices in Germany, he was recognized for leading the most successful and proactive offices within Europe. After his military career, he was appointed as Chief, Advanced Law Enforcement Training Division. In this capacity, Mr. Hinson led the development of the MP national counterdrug training program and managed the seven core antiterrorism courses which are critical for the modem MP Soldier. He also led the design team that developed the Stem Village training center. Mr. Hinson has done more to revolutionize and expand the training footprint of USAMPS than any other single leader since the school’s inception. Few individuals, military or civilians, have had such a profound impact on the Regiment and the Army.

Service Career 1978-2006

Command Sergeant Major James F. Barrett had a distinguished, multi-faceted career of more than 28 years including assignments at every level from team leader to Regimental Command Sergeant Major. His exemplary service from July 1978 to August 2006 included leadership positions at the highest levels of the Army, which immeasurably impacted the MP Corps Regiment and the quality of life for Soldiers and Army families. As the Regimental Command Sergeant Major, he spearheaded the largest transformation in the history of the Regiment during the Army’s Global War on Terrorism. His unique capacity to lead Soldiers and organizations set an example for the Army’s civilian and military leadership on a daily basis. His leadership and vision are clearly in concert with the MP Corps Regiment becoming known as the “Force of Choice.”

2011

Service Career 1972-2006

MG Donald J. Ryder’s distinguished career spanned over 34 years of dedicated service as a highly decorated member of the Military Police Corps with outstanding professional credentials. He served in every military police command position from Platoon Leader to the United States Army’s 11th Provost Marshal General. General Ryder’s recognized and noteworthy achievements in many key MP assignments proved critical in promoting and ensuring the continued independence, growth and relevance of the Military Police Corps as an integral and valued combat multiplier and contributor to the Army’s combined arms team. Major General Ryder’s leadership and visionary efforts distinguished himself as a highly respected MP Officer and leader. Ultimately, establishing the conditions for the Corps’ continuing growth and development, and enabled the Military Police Corps to meet the increasingly high demand for the Army’s “Force of Choice” in the Global War on Terrorism.

Service Career 1958-1984

Colonel Warren Kieffer Rees’ distinguished Army career of more than 26 years with valorous service in combat has measurably impacted the Law Enforcement and Force Protection role of the Military Police Corps in today’s Army. He contributed directly to the evolution of the MP Corps into a true combat support branch that has become a valued, versatile combat multiplier on today’s battlefield. During his prestigious and contributory career, Colonel Rees spent much time analyzing and restructuring the internal defense of the nation, currently known as Homeland Security. He was responsible for a renowned course of instruction, the Civil Disturbance Orientation Course (SEADOC), which trained both Military and Civilians from the Dept. of Defense, Dept. of State, the FBI, as well as civilian Police agencies throughout the United States. He would later go on to serve as the Corps Senior Combat Developer of Military Police Doctrine and Mission. He directly influenced the decision of Army Leadership to accept the rear security mission of the Corps, which advantageously changed the way Military Police train, and how they can support the Army.

Service Career 1966-1992

CSM James R. Armour had a distinguished, multifaceted career spanning over 26 years including service in every Noncommissioned Officer leadership position from Squad Leader to Command Sergeant Major. CSM Armour had a distinguishing career spanning from January 1966 to August 1992, serving in three separate theaters of combat operations, including two tours 109 miles behind the Iron Curtain in Berlin, Germany. CSM Armour contributed immeasurably to the shaping of the Military Police Corps Regiment into the versatile and respected professional branch it is today. CSM Armour had an indelible and enduring impact on the professional development of thousands of Soldiers, and served as an outstanding ambassador for the capabilities, technical and tactical competence, and professionalism of the Military Police Soldiers. His professional excellence and ability to demonstrate to other branches the capabilities of Military Police Soldiers set a stellar example throughout a critical transitional period in which the Military Police Corps transformed into a highly respected and affective Combat Support Branch known as “The Force of Choice”.

Service Career 1977-2000

CSM Merle D. Jones’ distinguished, multi-faceted career encompassed more than 23 years of military service in every Noncommissioned Officer leadership position from Team Leader to Command Sergeant Major. CSM Jones’ military career spanned from October 1977 to June 2000; during this time, he was awarded the Soldiers Medal for heroism, which is a true testament to his exemplary and selfless service to the United States of America, the Army, and the Soldiers of the Military Police Corps Regiment. As the 701st Military Police Battalion CSM he spearheaded the year-long daunting task of moving his Battalion from Anniston, AL to Ft Leonard Wood, MO in 2000, ensuring a seamless transition of the battalion with no impact to the Military Police schools training mission, the Quality of Life for Soldiers, and their families. Upon retirement, CSM Jones transformed and revitalized the MPRA through his leadership and business acumen, ultimately providing a solid foundation for the success that the MPRA enjoys today. CSM Jones is considered the Founder of the modern day MPRA.

Service Career 1975-1997

1SG Russel W. Strand has distinguished himself as an integral part of the Military Police Corps Regiment, dedicating over 35 years in service to this great Nation, in various capacities from Patrolman to Criminal Investigator. After his return from Operation Desert Shield and Desert Storm, where he served as a First Sergeant, he was assigned to the U.S. Army Military Police School and worked with the Family Advocacy Law Enforcement Program, developing tools for investigating child abuse and domestic violence. His outstanding work resulted in the first two courses relating to the subject matter to be developed in the Department of Defense. Following his service in uniform, he was immediately hired as a civilian instructor and placed in charge of the Family Advocacy Law Enforcement Training program. In just a few short years, he turned the program around, resulting in it becoming one of the most sought after courses of instruction in the Military. His contributions and selfless service led to his selection as the U.S. Army Military School Civilian Instructor of the year for 2002. He was eventually promoted to Division Chief for his section. He has developed countless programs, and has trained thousands of students in nearly every aspect of Domestic Violence, Sexual Assault, and Child Abuse investigations. The culmination of all his countless contributions resulted in the development of Forensic Experiential Trauma Interviewing. This unique tool changed the way Military Police conduct interviews with traumatized individuals. With his numerous and exemplary contributions to the MP Corps, he has truly made the United States Army a more capable and professional organization.

2012

Service Career 1955-1981

BG Kanamine was the first American Military Police Officer of Japanese ancestry to achieve the rank of General Officer. His belief in all aspects of fundamental American democratic ideals was shaped in spite of his forced placement as a young boy, along with his family, in a U.S. internment camp during World War II. BG Kanamine was a valued advisor for GEN Abrams as the Army moved toward a “volunteer force,” twice serving as his Aide-de-Camp. He commanded the 716th Military Police Battalion in Vietnam, the 89th Military Police Group at Fort Lewis, and upon promotion to Brigadier General, served as Provost Marshal and Commanding General, 15th Military Police Brigade in Germany. His pattern of service, spanning 27 years, directly impacted the professionalism and combat support readiness of Military Police personnel, Active and Reserve, within the U.S. Army.

Service Career 1918-1919, 1923-1927, 1943-1962

LTC Bird established and commanded the first Criminal Investigation Laboratory in North Africa (1943) during World War II while assigned to the 6709th CID Platoon (Provisional). In France, he converted a weapons carrier into a mobile crime laboratory that was used until the war ended. He is the only person to command all three CID laboratories in Japan, Europe and the United States. He is remembered for his leadership and guidance of Military Policemen, CID Agents and laboratory technicians, and is known throughout the Military Police Corps and CID community as a true pioneer in the field of forensics. LTC Bird was previously inducted into the CID Hall of Fame in August 2010.

Service Career 1962-2009

CW4 Mays pioneered efforts in Logistics Security preventing the diversion of untold millions of dollars’ worth of critical military property and materials from the logistics pipeline. Spanning a 46-year Army and civil service career, he was the key planner in formulating the Major Procurement Fraud investigative mission doctrine of USACIDC. His successes in investigating major fraud resulted in savings to the Army in excess of $200 million. He planned and managed highly complex Level 1 Drug Suppression operations resulting in the seizures of more than $170 million in illicit drugs. CW4 Mays was a dedicated leader of Soldiers and civilians. His vision, analytical ability, and professional courage in creating new missions and doctrine continue to impact the Military Police Corps, USACIDC, and the U.S. Army and will do so for years to come.

Service Career 1977-1999

1SG Ross began his Military Police career in 1977 as a Military Policeman at Fort Lewis, Washington, culminating 22 years later in 1999 with his retirement as a First Sergeant, Fort McClellan, Alabama. Throughout his career, 1SG Ross distinguished himself as the epitome of a noncommissioned officer and a true professional. After retirement, 1SG Ross continued to serve the Military Police Corps Regiment, first as an instructor for the Force Protection Training Division, and for the past 12 years as the Chief of the Basic Military Police Training Division (BMPTD), 14th MP Brigade. His outstanding performance in crucial leadership positions and his current dedication to training Soldiers on a daily basis is admirable and indicative of his loyalty to the Corps.

2013

Service Career 1977-2010

BG Johnson’s distinguished career of over 32 years included leadership positions from Platoon Leader to the Provost Marshal General of the Army. His career began at Ft Riley, KS as Commander of Leadership Team, 2nd Battalion, responsible for rehabilitating Soldiers assigned by the Military Justice System. Due to his outstanding performance he was selected to serve simultaneously as the Brigade HHC XO and Commander of the Duty Soldier Unit. BG Johnson then commanded the 545th MP CO (1st CAV) receiving superior ratings during his command. BG Johnson commanded the 720th MP BN, which was noted for its excellence and high morale. As Commander of the 14th MP Brigade, he relocated the Brigade from Fort McClellan, AL to Fort Leonard Wood, MO, while maintaining training, operations, and Soldier support. Following command, he was selected as the Executive Officer to the Director of the Army Staff; an accomplishment MP officers are not normally selected for. He was then selected as the Commandant of USAMPS and Chief, Military Police Corps Regiment, followed by the Commanding General of the Criminal Investigation Command and the Provost Marshal General. His efforts led the way, forging the future of the Military Police for years to come.

Service Career 1972-2009

CW5 Tackett’s service to the nation began in 1972 and spans 36 years, 33 of which he served as a USACIDC Special Agent. Throughout his career, the investigative techniques he developed and implemented are still used to this day. A multi-faceted Soldier, CW5 Tackett led investigations in all aspects of criminal investigations, which led to being hand selected for key leadership positions throughout his tenure as a USACIDC Special Agent. In 2003, CW5 Tackett was selected to be the first Regimental Chief Warrant Officer for the Military Police Corps. He quickly carved out his role in the leadership of the Regiment and established the position as a valuable and critical factor in the expansion of the professionalism and technical expertise of the Warrant Officer Corps. CW5 Tackett played a critical role in the redesign of the Warrant Officer Education System; ensuring the technical expertise and professionalism of the Warrant Officer Corps. His actions and accomplishments are the epitome of what a leader in the Military Police Corps should be. The legacy he leaves behind still influences the successful conduct of criminal investigations, ensuring CID will remain a premier federal investigative agency.

Service Career 1980-2010

CSM Butler served his nation and the Army with distinction and professionalism rarely seen in a class of highly professional leaders. He led from the front; deployed as a First Sergeant, a Battalion Command Sergeant Major, a Brigade Command Sergeant Major, and an echelons above Brigade Senior Enlisted Leader. Throughout his 30 year career, he excelled at every level of leadership responsibility, seemingly culminating in his selection to serve as the Regimental Command Sergeant Major of the Military Police Corps; the highest enlisted position within the Military Police Corps Regiment. The Sergeant Major of the Army and other senior leaders then selected CSM Butler for a Joint Nominative assignment to Task Force 134 in Iraq, where he would leverage his expert knowledge in detainee operations. CSM Butler successfully led the effort to lawfully transition responsibility for detained combatants, terrorists, and insurgents to the sovereign government of Iraq. CSM Butler is a leader among leaders, and an inspiration others will seek to emulate for generations to come. His personal influence in the future of the force, and his legacy of unparalleled leadership, will not soon be matched.

Service Career 1977-2009

Command Sergeant Major Farley’s illustrious career spans 32 years of active service to our country and the Military Police Corps Regiment, the United States Army, and our Nation. CSM Farley led from the front, by example, and was the embodiment of the type of Non-Commissioned Officer his Soldiers strived to be. He excelled at every level of leadership he was assigned to, providing sound advice, mentorship, and ultimately success to his organizations. He never shied away from complex issues, but relished the opportunity to use his extraordinary problem solving expertise when the Command was struggling for solutions. CSM Farley was the first enlisted leader within the Military Police Corps to serve at the two, three, and four star nominative levels of command. As a direct result of his professional excellence, leadership, and exemplary performance, the United States Army Pacific Command instituted the “Command Sergeant Major Mark L. Farley Best Military Police Company in USARPAC” unit award in his name. CSM Farley is the only enlisted Military Policeman ever bestowed this distinct honor. His career culminated as the Senior Enlisted Leader of the United States European Command.

2014

Service Career 1972-2011

Chief Warrant Officer Five Steven T. Okolovitch selflessly devoted himself to the accomplishment of the United States Army Military Police mission by his tenacity, energy, and hard work. He was a tireless teacher, coach, and mentor of subordinates. His accomplishments included millions of dollars of seized illegal drugs and the recovery of untold millions of dollars in United States Government property. His consistent exceptional duty performance and unparalleled achievements were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army Criminal Investigation Command and the Military Police Corps Regiment.

Service Career 1977-2004

Sergeant Major Reginald Cole for over 37 years of military and civil service has contributed immeasurably to the success of the Military Police Corps Regiment, the United States Army, and the Department of Defense. Mr. Cole displays exemplary conduct and his reputation of impeccable character was forged during a distinguished 27 year career as a Military policeman, culminating in 2004, and highlighted by his tenure as the Commandant, Maneuver Support Center Noncommissioned Officer Academy and Drill Sergeant School. In his current position as Deputy Director of Training and Education for the United States Army Military Police School, Mr. Cole leads the training, training development, and training support for over 50,000 Military Police Soldiers and Department of the Army Civilian Police, across all three components (Active Duty, National Guard, Army Reserve) and including our sister services and international partners.

Service Career 1944-1965

Sergeant First Class Francis Keiser, known as “Cowboy Bob”, was born 1 October 1934, growing up living a hard life in the Mohave Desert area of California, becoming a cowpuncher (cowboy) and rodeo star. He spent his entire military career 1944-1965 in the Military Police Corps and Criminal Investigation Division, serving in Both World War II and the Korean War where he was credited with saving hundreds of men and a large part of the 2nd Infantry Division when it was trapped in North Korea on 30 November 1950, for which he was recommended for the Medal of Honor.

2015

Service Career 1983-2012

Command Sergeant Major (R) Charles Kirkland had an illustrious 29 year career of service to the Military Police Corps Regiment. He distinguished himself through demonstrated professionalism, excellence, and competence in every position from Private to CSM and at every echelon from Company to Brigade. His faithful service and stellar career in both peacetime and combat environments culminated with his selection as the 10th Regimental Command Sergeant Major of the Military Police Corps Regiment in November 2008. During his tenure (2008-2011), CSM Kirkland had a direct impact on the largest growth of the Military Police Corps during the previous 30 years. He perfected the incorporation of lessons learned and Tactics, Techniques, Procedures into Institutional Training and Leader Development programs and initiated actions that led to the implementation of the 31K MOS. As part of the Regimental Command team, his contributions to the success of the Regiment will be everlasting.

Service Career 1987-2008

Command Sergeant Major (R) Tony McGee had a distinguished and diverse career that spanned 21 years. He served in every leadership position from Team Leader to Command Sergeant Major. His exceptional service from March 27, 1987-March 1, 2008 included highly critical positions that had significant impact on the Regiment. His dedication to the welfare of his Soldiers and their families was unmatched and positively affected every unit in which he served. Throughout his career he developed tactics and techniques, which ultimately saved the lives of Military Police while serving in combat. His outstanding leadership qualities inspired his Soldiers to achieve excellence in all endeavors both in peace and war. His leadership and dedication enhanced the reputation of the Regiment throughout the United States Army. His lasting impact as President of the National Board of Directors for the Military Police Regimental Association will be felt by Military Police Soldiers and their families for years to come.

Service Career 1948-1978

Sergeant Major (R) Gilbert Verbist served in the U.S. Army as an infantryman and Military Police Soldier from February 1948 through February 1978. He completed five tours in combat; one tour in the Republic of Korea where he participated in two combat parachute jumps and four combat tours in Vietnam. He demonstrated tremendous discipline, courage and commitment to duty during these dangerous and demanding tours. Sergeant Major Verbist holds the exclusive distinction of performing 556 static line parachute jumps in his 30 years of service. His many contributions, superior leadership and extraordinary personal example of determination and commitment are a forever lasting contribution to the Military Police Corps heritage. He retired from active duty on 1 March 1978, concluding his military career as the 82nd Airborne Division Provost Sergeant. His love of country and enthusiasm to serve others set him apart as an influential and exemplary leader.

2016

Service Career 1965-1997

Major General (R) Alfonso Lenhardt had a uniquely distinguished career of over 31 years, serving from Private to Major General, while measurably impacting the Military Police Corps Regiment’s mission and establishing a sound foundation for the tremendous successes enjoyed by the Regiment. His faithful service and
diverse career experience in both peace and war resulted in his selection as Commanding, General, Fort McClellan & Commandant, United States Army Military Police School in 1994, and culminated in his selection as the Commanding General, U.S. Army Recruiting Command in 1996. He graduated from OCS in 1966, serving as an Infantry Officer in Vietnam, followed by his branch transfer to the Military Police Corps where he commanded at every level from company, battalion, and brigade to Commandant of the Regiment. Major General (R) Lenhardt served in almost every facet of the military police career field in addition to developing future enlisted and officer military police leaders and developing new cadets as a Tactical Officer at West Point. He contributed at the National level while serving as an Executive Officer on the Office of the Secretary of Defense Staff and as Chief of Staff for the Strategic Defense Initiative Office. As Commandant, he orchestrated several initiatives, including both the MK 19 weapons system and Armored Security Vehicle (ASV), which later proved to be instrumental in the War on Terror and during combat operations in the Middle East. His vision and contributions to our Regiment are still impactful today.

Service Career 1981-2007

Colonel James Harrison, Jr.’s sterling 26-year career was one of outstanding service to the Military Police Corps Regiment, the Army and our Nation. Colonel Harrison made the ultimate sacrifice for our Nation when he was Killed in Action in Afghanistan in 2007 while helping the Afghan Ministry of Defense establish a professional detention capability. Colonel Harrison was a leader in modernizing and improving the Regiment’s Corrections and Detention Operations. While serving as the Operations Officer of the 704th Military Police Battalion and Fort Lewis Regional Corrections Facility, he was instrumental in the initial development of what would become the Military Police Internment and Resettlement Battalion. As the 47th Commandant of the U.S. Disciplinary Barracks (USDB), he transitioned assigned units from TDA organizations into deployable units providing the Army with the capability to conduct high-risk detention operations. He was the first USDB Commandant to earn the Certified Correctional Executive status from the American Correctional Association. As one of the only two Certified Corrections Executives in uniform, coupled with his vast experience with U.S. military prisoner corrections, the Provost Marshal General personally selected him for a critical position with the Combined Security Transition Command-Afghanistan. He was serving in this position when he was killed in action. His vision and contributions continue to contribute to the Army and Regiment as demonstrated by the many successful deployments of Internment and Resettlement units to Iraq, Afghanistan, Kuwait and Cuba over the past 13 years.

Service Career 1948-1978

Lieutenant Colonel (R) Rex A. Smith’s diverse 26-year career spanned from the Military Police Corp’s activation to 1962. He was one of the Regiment’s pioneering military police, beginning his military police career as an enlisted MP in Hawaii in 1940 before the Military Police Corps was a permanent branch of the Army. In 1942 he attended OCS and became a MP Officer serving in Iceland, England, France, Germany, Austria, and Belgium through the end of World War II. As a MP Platoon Leader he landed on Utah Beach in June 1944 on D-Day at H + 105, facilitating the flow of personnel and equipment moving through the beach’s Red Sector. During the Korean War as a Major, he served as the 8th Army Provost Marshal CID Chief, directing 6 CID units across the peninsula responsible for investigating over 300 homicides. After the war, he continued to serve across the United States and Germany, mentoring military police with his extensive real world experience as the Military Police Corps matured. His outstanding performance in crucial leadership positions, and his dedication to improving the Military Police Corps Regiment is admirable and indicative of his loyalty to the Regiment and the Army.

Service Career 1967-1997

Command Sergeant Major (R) Thomas Davis’ valorous 30-year Army career began as an Infantryman in Vietnam followed by 24 years of distinguished service across the Military Police Corps Regiment. His example of the Warrior Ethos and Resiliency as a Vietnam Prisoner of War continues to positively impact the Regiment today. He holds exclusive distinction for his resiliency; spending 1,832 days in captivity from March 11, 1968 until released during Operation Home Coming March 16, 1973. After returning home and transferring to the Military Police Corps, he continued to demonstrate his professionalism by serving with distinction in every enlisted leadership billet including Battalion and Brigade Command Sergeant Major, across the United States and overseas. Command Sergeant Major (R) Davis led key components of the Regiment during its largest transformation in history. He served as Command Sergeant Major of the 795th and 395th Military Police Battalions as well as the 8th and 18th Military Police Brigades. His stellar military career culminated in 1997 at Armstrong State College as a ROTC Instructor where he developed and mentored the Army’s future leadership. His love of country and dedication to those who served and continue to serve is demonstrated by his exemplary leadership as he continues to work hand in hand with the Army, the Regiment and former Prisoners of War.

Service Career 1981-2011

Command Sergeant Major (R) Brian Lambert has made a tremendous impact on the Military Police Corps Regiment and Army during his illustrious 29-year career, culminating as the Command Sergeant Major of the 16th Military Police Brigade. While serving in every enlisted leadership billet from Team Leader to Command Sergeant Major, he directly improved policing, security, mobility and corrections operations in both peacetime and war, simultaneously training and leading Allied and U.S. Service Members and Army Civilians across the globe. While serving as the operations Sergeant Major of the 14th Military Police Brigade, Command Sergeant Major (R) Lambert established a new Program of Instruction to train Active, Guard and Reserve Soldiers newly reclassified as military police, helping mitigate the Army’s shortage during a crucial period; this was done in addition to conducting the brigade’s annual training mission of over 6000 civilian and military personnel. His four combat deployments as a Command Sergeant Major of both the 503d Military Police Battalion (Airborne) and 16th Military Police Brigade touched every facet of the Regiment’s missions. During his tours in Iraq, he established professional training programs for Iraqi Police and ensured Task Force 134 was fully capable of caring for a detainee capacity that doubled to 26,000. In Afghanistan he ensured the brigade effectively oversaw detainee operations, law and order, customs and Military Working Dog support across the entire theater. Throughout this time he continued to mentor others who are currently serving as leaders across the Regiment. His numerous contributions have left an enduring mark on the Regiment and improved the lives of our Soldiers, Army Civilians and Families.

2017

Service Career 1980-2011

BG (R) David D. Phillips illustrious career spans 31 years of active service to the Military Police Corps and the United States Army. His career reads to have been scripted for action in the War on Terror as he was called to duty on the fateful day of September 11, 2001 while serving as the Director of Security at the Pentagon. From that day forward, his experiences while serving as a Commander and Primary Staff member were not only instrumental in the MP Corps and Army’s success, but shaped his vision for the MP Corps for years to come. He culminated his career as the Commandant of the United States Military Police School. In this role, he took his vast knowledge and experience from fighting the War on Terror and reshaped the training, professional development and structure of the MP Corps and led the charge in establishing the 31K MOS within the MP Corps.

Service Career 1973-1997

Colonel (R) Mary A. Maier’s sterling Army career of 24 years to the Military Police Corps Regiment is the embodiment of a professional officer that has made a lasting and profound impact on our regiment. From her commission into the Woman’s Army Corps, Colonel Maier had an expansive and illustrious career calumniating as being selected as the first woman to Command the 16th MP BDE. Due to her demonstrated skills training and leading Soldiers, she was asked and willingly volunteered to be recalled to active duty to serve as the Rear Provisional Brigade Commander of the 16th Military Police Brigade. Her performance was so skilled that this model of drawing on a talented pool of Military Police Mentors during a time of extremely high OPTEMPO became a new precedent.

Service Career 1977-2016

Colonel (R) Donald Salo’s distinguished Army career of 31 years, measurably impacted the Military Police Corps’ mission and provided foundation for the tremendous successes enjoyed by the Regiment over the course of the last three decades. He rose through the ranks from Private First Class to a member of the Senior Executive Service. He commanded at every level from company to brigade and later became the first member of the Senior Executive Service to serve as the Director of the Office of the Provost Marshal General’s Field Operating Agency, the Defense Forensics and Biometrics Agency. He developed the minds and bodies of new MP Officer Basic and Advanced Course Students as the Chief, Command and Tactics Division 93 at the U.S. Military Police School. He served at the Pentagon as the Director, Army Base Realignment and Closure Office, and as Executive Officer to the Assistant Chief of Staff for Installation Management, positions which he used to continue to support Military Police equities.

2018

Service Career 1986-2011

Colonel (R) John F. Garrity’s distinguished career began as a Platoon Leader in 1987 and culminated as the Commander of the Army’s only Airborne Military Police Brigade in 2008. Colonel Garrity developed innovative solutions to complex problems, helped subordinates mature as leaders, and brought his passion for soldering to all he encountered. He lived by a simple credo: “Be a Professional” and charged his subordinates to embrace this motto and command philosophy. He imbued the warrior spirit in all those he led while at the same time caring for those under his charge. Colonel Garrity deployed units into combat as a Company,
Battalion, and Brigade Commander.

Service Career 1968-1996

Colonel (R) William L. Hart’s service spanned over thirty-four years and includes combat service from Vietnam through Afghanistan. COL(R) Hart was dedicated to the growth, development, and welfare of the Military Police Corps. Serving in key policy and operational personnel positions, he developed systems used by all services for congressionally mandated joint service in Confinement Operations. His competence in the construction of compliant confinement facilities resulted in his recall to active duty in a role essential to the establishment of the Rule of Law in the Global War on Terror. His multiple contributions to the Military Police Corps will impact generations to come.

Service Career 1975-2000

Chief Warrant Officer Four (R) David J. Zeliff’s distinguished Army career spanned more than thirty-eight years and he has represented our Regiment at the Department of Justice, Department of Defense  and numerous civilian law enforcement and academic organizations. A consummate professional, he is widely recognized as one of the very best criminal investigators in the U.S. Army. Mr. Zeliff has been, and continues to be, a distinguished senior leader and his contributions will have an enduring impact on our Regiment.

Service Career 1983-2008

Command Sergeant Major (R) Dorsey Newcomb’s twenty-five year career was exemplified by the excellence of his Soldiers’ accomplishments and the Military Police units in which he served. He distinguished himself as a leader of the highest caliber throughout his career in every leadership position from Squad Leader to Command Sergeant Major. He continued to serve the Military Police Corps Regiment after his retirement in 2008 as a member and President of the National Board of Directors for the Military Police Regimental Association. He is recognized as one of our most influential retired senior leaders that continues to favorably impact our Regiment.

2019

Service Career 1978-2015

Colonel Wade F. Dennis’ thirty-six year service career with the Military Police Corps Regiment was exemplary by every account.  His performance was outstanding and indelibly cast a positive impact upon the Regiment at every position he held during his distinguished career.  Most importantly, was his inspirational influence on the countless Soldiers, Non-Commissioned Officers, and Officers he led, coached, and mentored throughout his career.  Many went on to serve at the highest echelons in the Army while others were inspired to continue their service and pursue goals they previously thought unattainable.  His performance has always been marked by excellent results supported by his unyielding commitment and delivering his absolute best no matter the situation.  Throughout his assignments, COL Dennis was championed as the consummate team builder.  His gift has always been bringing Soldiers together and bonding them as a tight-knit team dedicated to a collective goal and purpose.

Service Career 1965-1991

Colonel Joel L. Leson’s Military Police and Force Development career spanned over twenty-six years. His specialties were combined to provide the Military Police Corps Regiment and the Army with projects and programs that went from the United States Army Military Police School (USAMPS) “drawing board” to tangible Army policies and onto the battlefield. COL Leson’s Military Police doctrinal force structure and combat equipment development skills remain visible on the battlefield today. His skills and experience were felt at the Company, Battalion, Brigade and Division levels. COL Leson commanded at all levels from Company command to Brigade command providing extraordinary leadership and innovation to his staff and Soldiers. COL Leson’s outstanding service to his country during peace and war are in the highest traditions of the Military Police Corps, the US Army, and the Nation.

Service Career 1974-2003

Colonel Daniel M. Quinn distinguished himself through exceptionally meritorious service over his twenty-nine years of service. In every assignment, he provided outstanding leadership, unmatched technical competence, and unending selfless service. He commanded at every level from Company to Brigade and served in key staff positions at major commands and Department of the Army (DA) levels. His leadership as Commander of the 5th Military Police Battalion (CID) and later as Commander of the 6th Military Police Group (CID) produced magnificent accomplishments in investigative support provided to senior Army commanders. Whether commanding troops, establishing DoD Task Forces, or guiding a MACOM staff in its support to worldwide criminal investigation efforts, COL Quinn was the catalyst of success. COL Quinn’s impact to the Military Police Corps Regiment, the Army and the Department of Defense has been exceptionally significant and resoundingly positive.

Service Career 1987-2009

First Sergeant Ricky G. Harne’s twenty-two years of active duty military service exemplified the Military Police motto “Of the Troops, for the Troops”.  He established himself as a leader of the highest caliber in every position from Team Leader to First Sergeant.  His exemplary leadership while serving in several select and highly visible positions had a tremendous impact on the Military Police Corps Regiment and its reputation among the most senior Department of Defense and Army leadership.  The trust and confidence placed on 1SG Harne and his Soldiers by these senior civilians and uniformed leaders as they traveled the world contributed immensely to the outstanding reputation that our Regiment enjoys today.  Immediately following his retirement from active duty, 1SG Harne became the Executive Director of the Military Police Regimental Association (MPRA).  He has gone above and beyond in leading the association to achieve many tremendous accomplishments that will continue to promote the history and preserve the traditions of our storied Regiment for many generations to come.

2020

Service Career 1981-2012

Brigadier General John A. “Jack” Hammond served with distinction in the Military Police Corps Regiment throughout a career spanning over 31 years. His combat service during Operation Iraqi Freedom as commander of the 211th Military Police Battalion (First Corps of Cadets) required him to simultaneously command two separate battalion-level combined arms task forces. BG Hammond commanded the 26th Maneuver Enhancement Brigade during a deployment in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. BG Hammond is the only Military Police general officer to command a Maneuver Enhancement Brigade in combat. Since his retirement in 2012, BG Hammond has served as the Executive Director of “Home Base” a Boston Red Sox Foundation and Massachusetts General Hospital partnership program.

Service Career 1980-2010

Colonel Michael Galloucis served in the Military Police Corps Regiment during the Cold War through the Global War on Terrorism. COL Galloucis commanded the 924th Military Police Battalion and was selected for brigade command. During his command, the 89th Military Police Brigade conducted a 15 month deployment in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom. His other key assignments include Media spokesman for the 35th Army Chief of Staff and the Executive Officer to the Director of the Army Operations Center.  Some of his accomplishments include the planning of Operation Noble Eagle and the re-establishment of the Office of the Provost Marshal General (OPMG). Following retirement, he continues to serve in the Senior Executive Service at the Department of Veterans Affairs.

Service Career 1981-2008

While on active duty, Colonel Eugene Smith established and commanded the 94th Military Police Battalion, and subsequently selected to command the 709th Military Police Battalion. COL Smith’s leadership was critical as the Director of Antiterrorism Policy, Office of the Secretary of Defense for Special Operations and Low Intensity Conflict in the wake of 9/11. COL Smith’s enduring impacts in a civilian capacity include the implementation of Automated Installation Entry, Department of the Army Security Guard Standardization, and Military Ocean Terminal Sunny Point protection. Throughout his 41 years of service, he continues to be a valuable member of the MP Regiment.

Service Career

Chief Warrant Officer Five Guy Surian served over a 45 year career as an enlisted, warrant officer, and civilian criminal investigator culminating in his assignment as the Deputy G3 for Investigative Operations, United States Army Criminal Investigation Command (USACIDC). His significant contributions include the development and implementation of the CID Criminal Intelligence Program, CID Digital Forensic Examiner Program, and the CID Sexual Assault Response Program. Since his retirement from active duty in 2000, he continues to serve Military Police Corps and the United States Army at USACIDC.

Service Career 1983-2013

Chief Warrant Officer Five TL Williams served in various assignments as a young Soldier, ultimately earning the title as Special Agent in 1990. As a Special Agent, CW5 Williams distinguished herself as an intuitive investigator whose early success with felony investigations quickly identified her as having exceptional potential in the rapidly progressing field of Forensic Science. Throughout her career she served as the Special Agent in Charge/ Operations Officer for 11th Military Police Battalion (CID) and 6th Military Police Group (CID). CW5 Williams was selected as the 2nd Regimental Chief Warrant Officer for the United States Army Military Police School, culminating as the Command Chief Warrant Officer, United States Army Criminal Investigation Command. Retired from active duty, she supports the Regiment as a Supervisory Criminal Investigator and Forensic Science Officer.

Service Career 1983-2015

Command Sergeant Major Jonathan Godwin distinguished himself throughout a stellar career that spanned over 32 years. During his military career CSM Godwin worked in all levels and types of military correctional and detention facilities; performed in every correctional duty position; and held every enlisted leadership position in the Army and the Army Corrections field. CSM Godwin’s vast experience and expertise established him as the Army’s expert in enemy detention operations. During a very dark time in history for the United States of America, the Department of Defense, Department of the Army and US Army MP Corps Regiment, CSM Godwin deployed and led a team to begin correcting EPW atrocities of the GWOT, these efforts evolved into how current detention operations missions are now conducted. CSM Godwin followed on with numerous other deployments to Iraq where he served as the Sergeant Major of the Theater Internment Facility at Camp Bucca, Camp Remembrance I, Fort Suse and Camp Cropper – Remembrance II. Throughout his GWOT deployments CSM Godwin assisted senior leadership with detainee policy implementation and became recognized as the leading SME for EPW and detention operations, frequently being referred to as the ‘Godfather of Detainee Operations’. CSM Godwin later served as the Command Sergeant Major of the 796th Military Police Battalion; the 96th Military Police Battalion; the United States Disciplinary Barracks; and the 15th Military Police Brigade. CSM Godwin then reached the pinnacle of the Army Corrections and Detention profession – culminating a distinguished career as the Command Sergeant Major of the U.S. Army Corrections Command; responsible for all Army Corrections System personnel and facilities worldwide. CSM Godwin continues to serve the DoD corrections and detention community as a civilian member of the Department of the Navy, Navy Personnel Command, Corrections and Programs Office.

Service Career 1985-2008

Sergeant First Class Timothy Prevost served from 1985 to 2008 and established himself as a combat leader who had the professional knowledge and flexibility to perform a variety of missions in war and in peace. He served a total of 34 months in Iraq and Afghanistan being injured twice.  SFC Prevost sacrificed his own personal safety in order to safeguard his Soldiers, peers and leaders while under enemy fire. For demonstrating outstanding leadership, personal courage and the willingness to put himself in harm’s way to save others, he earned the Bronze Star Medal with a “V” device for Valor and two Purple Hearts for injuries sustained in combat. Since his retirement in 2008, he serves in the Director of Emergency Services at Fort Bragg, NC.

Service Career 2001-2007

Sergeant Bryan Anderson deployed twice in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) where he served as a Gunner, Driver and Team Leader. On October 23, 2005, while on combat patrol, he was involved in an IED attack that left him a triple amputee. For his injuries sustained in combat, he was awarded the Purple Heart. Since his retirement from active duty, Sergeant Anderson is involved with numerous veteran organizations, continues to bring awareness to wounded warriors and their sacrifices, and consistently highlights the positive influence of the Military Police Corps and the United States Army has on his life.